Kathleen Doyle

Professor Kathleen Doyle's fields of teaching and research interest include Spanish language, second language acquisition, cultural studies, Peninsular Spanish women authors of the 19th through 21st centuries, post-Spanish Civil War narrative, Golden Age drama, gender studies, film studies, and fantastic and gothic narrative. Her publications explore the following topics, among others: the role of fantasy in the construction of gender and narrative authority in works by female authors during the Franco regime; the representation of female sexuality and identity in early 20th century novellas; the woman detective in recent Spanish crime fiction; and gendered violence and colonial anxieties in late 19th century Spanish fiction. She has begun a project which examines the work of contemporary poet Juana Castro’s works through the lens of ecofeminist theory. Many of her advanced literature courses are cross-listed in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Gender Violence and Late Colonial Anxieties in ′Piña′ by Emilia Pardo Bazán." Caribe 11.2 (Invierno de 2008-2009): 7-22.

"The Gothic in Carmen Martín Gaite′s El cuarto de atrás: Destabilizing the Sección Femenina′s Myth ofla mujer muy mujer." Beyond the Back Room: New Perspectives on Carmen Martín Gaite. Ed. Marian Womack and Jennifer Wood. London: Peter Lang, 2011.

"Body of Evidence: The Legislation of Female Desire in ′El Artículo 438′ by Carmen de Burgos." Letras femeninas 30.2 (junio 2004): 156-164.

"Mapping Future Paths: Fantasy and Self-Discovery in Carmen Martín Gaite′s Books for Children." Article in refereed volume, ed. Jorge H. Valdivieso, L. Teresa Valdivieso and Enrique Ruiz-Fornells. La mujer hispana en el mundo: sus triunfos y sus retos/ Hispanic Women in the World: Accomplishments and Challenges. Phoenix: Editorial Orbis, 2000. 212-217.

Education

BA., Spanish, Saint Xavier College, summa cum laude
MA., Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish), University of Chicago
PhD., Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish), University of Chicago