Paul Ortiz: The Making of an African American and Latinx History of the United States

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Contact person: Christy Waldkirch

An African American and Latinx History of the United States is a new interpretation of US history that builds on earlier generations of ethnic studies scholarship. An intersectional history of the shared struggle for human rights from 1776 to present, the book is an accessible narrative history arguing that Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa were integral to the development of democracy in the United States. From this grassroots perspective, ordinary people sought to build bridges of solidarity between the nations—not walls. Ortiz will discuss how the book is being integrated into college and high school social studies curricula seeking inclusiveness and historical accuracy.
 

Structural Stigma and Health Inequalities: Mark Hatzenbuehler

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Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, PhD, is Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences and Sociology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.  He has published over 110 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the role of stigma in shaping health inequalities.  His work has been published in leading journals, including American Psychologist, Psychological Bulletin, American Journal of Public Health, and JAMA Pediatrics, and has been cited in amicus curiae briefs for case on status-based discrimination. He has received several awards for his research, including the 2016 Early Caree Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest from the American Psychological Association.

Urban Studies

Phi Beta Kappa Lecture: Shakespeare, Race and Performance: What We Still Don't Know

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Nontraditional casting — the practice of casting actors of color in roles that were originally imagined as white characters to be performed by white actors — is a common phenomenon in British and American theatre and film. Yet very little research has been conducted on the effects of perceptions of race on the reception of classical performances. Scholars interested in audience reception have mostly been limited to anecdotal sources: theatre reviews, interviews with artists, and overheard conversations. Thompson aims to challenge our scholarly understandings of audience responses to nontraditional casting.

Ayanna Thompson is professor of English at George Washington, specializing in Renaissance drama and issues of race in/as performance. She is the author of "Teaching Shakespeare with Purpose: A Student-Centered Approach"; "Passing Strange: Shakespeare, Race, and Contemporary America"; and "Performing Race and Torture on the Early Modern Stage." She wrote the new introduction for the revised Arden 3 "Othello," and is the co-editor (with Scott Newstok) of "Weyward Macbeth: Intersections of Race and Performance" and editor of "Colorblind Shakespeare: New Perspectives on Race and Performance." Currently on the editorial boards of "Shakespeare Quarterly," "Renaissance Drama," and "Shakespeare Bulletin," she is a member of the board of directors for the Association of Marshall Scholars and was recently elected President of the Shakespeare Association of America.

Free Speech, Diversity, Inclusion: Is There a Balance?

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A Conversation With:

Keegan Callanan, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College; Noelle Chaddock, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Diversity and Inclusivity, Rhodes College; James R. Stoner, Jr., Hermann Moyse, Jr., Professor and Director of the Eric Voegelin Institute in the Department of Political Science, Louisiana State University

Moderated by: Daniel Cullen, Professor of Political Science, Rhodes College

Commenting on the recent incident at Middlebury College that has galvanized the higher-ed community, an editorial in the Atlantic Monthly concluded: “What once seemed like a divide among students has now created a fault line in the academic community, in what is perhaps a fitting example of the constructive dialogue that should have occurred on the Middlebury campus. Even so, it raises the question: How can students strike the appropriate balance between protest and tolerance when their educators disagree on which is most important?”

Join us for a discussion of this important question, Monday April 17th at 7:00pm in McCallum Ballroom. A dessert reception will precede the discussion at 6:30 in the Crain Reception Hall. Seats and desserts will be first come, first served.

 

Political Science

Historian and Author Timothy Tyson: The Blood of Emmett Till

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Reception at 5:30 p.m., event to follow at 6 p.m.

The 1955 lynching of Emmett Till was a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement and remains a crucial symbol of the national struggle for racial justice. To discuss the killing and its contexts, we welcome author Timothy B. Tyson, historian and author of the acclaimed and bestselling new book The Blood of Emmett Till. Tyson’s groundbreaking research – which includes the first-ever interview with accuser Carolyn Bryant – sheds new light on what happened to the 14-year-old Till, as well as the larger consequences of his murder on Mississippi, Chicago, and the United States. As we continue to wrestle with the causes and effects of racial violence, the Till case and the movement it provoked remain vital to understanding both past and present. 

Joining Tyson this evening will be two respondents who will enrich the conversation:

·         Aram Goudsouzian – Chair of History Department at the University of Memphis

·         Doria Johnson – Activist, Historian, and 2016 Nelson Mandela Fellow for International Dialogues

 

Africana Studies

Holograms and Microwaves: The Science of Black Music

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The Africana Studies Program at Rhodes College is proud to welcome acclaimed scholar Shana L. Redmond. An interdisciplinary scholar of music, race, and politics, Redmond centers the sounds of the African diaspora within the global struggle for Black liberation. She offers groundbreaking and thought-provoking insights into how the practice of music-making has reflected and redirected the formation of racial identities and the resistance to colonialism and white supremacy.

Redmond is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (2014) and Associate Professor of Musicology and African American Studies at UCLA. She is a contributor to and co-editor for Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader (2016) and series co-editor for Music of the African Diaspora on the University of California Press. 

Africana Studies
Africana Studies Program, Memphis Center

Archives of Agency: Food in the Struggle for Black Liberation

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In Black Liberation movements in the United States, food plays not only a biological
role but also a political one. In this talk, Dr. Ashanté Reese explores the ways in which
Black Liberation movements use food as a platform for mobilizing communities and
making connections between historical and contemporary movements, and also considers
how organizing around food demonstrates multifaceted resistance.

 

Africana Studies

Baldwin Now Symposium: Keynote Lecture

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This two-day symposium celebrates the life and legacy of James Baldwin. Baldwin’s work has become a touchstone in our present cultural moment. Baldwin is an intellectual forbearer of Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jesmyn Ward, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement, and a key reference for post-civil rights discussions of race in America. As such, Baldwin continues to be a cultural catalyst for American society.

Keynote lecture by Dwight McBride, author of Impossible Witness, Why I Hate Abercrombie and Fitch, and editor of James Baldwin Now.

The Symposium continues March 30 @ 6:00 p.m. in Ellington 100 at the University of Memphis with a roundtable discussion with leading Baldwin scholars Quentin Miller, Soyica Colbert, and Magdalena Zaborowska. Moderated by Ernest Gibson.

History

Tanisha C. Ford

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Professor Tanisha Ford, author of Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style and the Global Politics of Soul, will be giving a public lecture and signing copies of her new book on Tuesday, March 22 at 6pm in Blount Auditorium.

 

Co-sponsor : Office of External Programs